Welcome to Martin Henderson Online, a fansite dedicated to the very talented, versatile, and handsome New Zealand born actor Martin Henderson. Martin is best known for his roles in films 'The Ring,' 'Bride & Prejudice,' 'Torque,' and 'Flyboys,' among many others, as well as television series 'Secrets & Lies' (Australian), 'The Red Road,' 'Grey's Anatomy,' and currently 'Virgin River' on Netflix.

Here at Martin Henderson Online, we will provide you with the latest news and updates as well as the most complete and accurate information on Martin--respectful of his privacy--so be sure to visit us frequently.
Archived interviews (prior to 2019)

Home Forums Martin’s interviews (current and archived) Archived interviews (prior to 2019)

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  • #1369
    Rachelle
    Keymaster
    #1490
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    I have a shitload of Marty interviews–soooo many…And I saved them all from the old forum. LOL! Here’s the Pavement interview I posted about in 2006…Most original links are dead/defunct now…
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    Here’s an old Marty interview I found on the ‘net at http://www.thebigidea.co.nz (originally from NZ magazine Pavement, circa 2003/2004). I believe this interview went along with the Pavement pix that have been in the image gallery for quite some time now.
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    Martin Henderson – Now that I’m older I don’t give a ….
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    Date Monday, June 30 @ 13:09:24
    Topic Film
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    Courtesy of Pavement Magazine with thanks…
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    What a difference a few short years living overseas can make to a television soap star’s career.
    Oh sure, for those of us old enough to remember his character Stuart Neilson, he still looks like just a slightly older version of the ‘teen hunk’ who graced so many magazine covers at the height of his fame. But this is most definitely not the same Martin Henderson who played Shortland Street’s favourite pin-up boy from
    1992-95.
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    For one, there’s the permanent American accent. Convinced he was sabotaging Hollywood auditions because he had to think too much about his voice, Henderson now sounds like any other native Californian. Ask the 28-year-old to change back to a Kiwi twang and you cringe. It’s almost that bad. Yes, he gets ribbing for switching ‘sides’. But no, he doesn’t much care what anyone thinks.
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    Gone is the old Henderson uncertainty, the angst and the burning desire to please Shortland Street publicists, fans and TV critics alike. In its place, Henderson now sports Tom Cruise-like locks and beard and the movie star swagger of a guy who may not buy into the hype that he’s Hollywood’s Next Big Thing but knows he’s taken that first major step to becoming a Serious Player.
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    “A lot of the changes just come with getting older,” says Henderson, in hometown Auckland to see family and friends and to talk up his first big-screen male lead in the word-of-mouth horror hit The Ring.
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    “When I was 17 and on Shortland Street and being that recognised and exposed, I really cared what people thought about me. I put a lot of pressure on myself because of that. I felt I needed to represent the show in the right way and be so well-behaved. But at the same time, I just wanted to get drunk with my mates and meet girls. Now that I’m older, I don’t give a sh*t. It doesn’t matter what someone else thinks.”
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    Least of all now, Hollywood studio bosses. While John Woo’s Windtalkers, starring Nicholas Cage and Christian Slater, wasn’t exactly a box office success, Henderson’s portrayal of the sensitive soldier Nellie pining for his sweetheart back home sent casting directors into a spin. Then he won the male lead opposite the British-born/Australian-bred Naomi Watts (Mulholland Drive) in The Ring, a re-make of a cult Japanese horror film about a videotape that kills its viewers seven days after they’ve seen it.
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    It’s hard to say just what impact Henderson’s role as Watts’ doomed boyfriend Noah has had on overall takings – Henderson himself admits The Ring is Watts’ film – but it opened at number one on its release in the US and is now rapidly closing in on a worldwide gross of US$200 million.
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    A more conclusive test of Henderson’s Hollywood pulling power will come when he reappears at the end of the year as the leather-bound star of Torque, a kind of The Fast and The Furious action romp on two wheels, co-starring Ice Cube, Monet Mazur (Just Married) and Jaime Pressly.
    Whether biker movies are your thing or not, you can’t help but admire Henderson for the career risks.
    Bored with playing Stuart Neilson and stifled by his celebrity, Henderson left Shortland Street when it was still a ratings phenomenon. Then, just when he was being groomed for TV stardom across the Tasman and about to break into the Australian film world in 1999, he turned his back on Easy Street again, this time to struggle as a flat-broke, anonymous acting student in New York.
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    It’s the stuff of made-for-TV movies. His Aussie CV boasts parts in the short-lived soaps Echo Point and Sweat, the latter opposite good buddy and former roommate Heath Ledger; Prime TV’s Big Sky; and lastly, an AFI Award nomination for his supporting role in Kick, the big screen story of a rugby player who swaps his muddy shorts for ballet tights.
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    “Everyone thought I was mad to do what I did and move to New York,” admits Henderson. “But I’d made my mind up. I knew the actor I wanted to be and I didn’t think I was going to attain that living in Australia and doing the kind of TV work I’d been doing. It wasn’t challenging me. I wasn’t growing and I’d become quite disillusioned with acting.
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    “I’d lost my drive for it and had become pretty apathetic about a lot of things. I was drinking a lot, partying and really lost my passion for [acting]. I let work come to me. Someone would offer me a part on a TV show and I’d be like, ‘Fine. You want me to do that? I’ll do that’. But I never stepped back and said, ‘What do I want?’
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    From as early as he can remember, Henderson always wanted to be like his childhood heroes Harrison Ford and Christopher Reeve, who he watched at the old Civic theatre on Auckland’s Queen Street. As he later struggled for direction in Sydney, the only way he believed he had a serious shot at his Hollywood dream was to rediscover his passion for acting in the most disciplined environment he could find, a world away from the parties, publicists and fast-turnaround TV.
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    Enter from stage left, as in way-out-in-left-field stage left: The Neighbourhood Playhouse School of Theatre on East 54 Street, Manhattan, New York. The school’s alumni include Gregory Peck, Robert Duvall, writer David Mamet, Diane Keaton, Dylan McDermott from TV’s The Practice and acclaimed director Sydney Pollack.
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    “I knew it was a very disciplined school and I needed that,” says Henderson. “I’d become pretty complacent about a lot of things and I knew there was a certain regiment there I needed. From the speech, voice, singing, dancing… the whole bit.
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    “I just felt that New York would give me the key to who I wanted to be as an actor; to find my ideals, what drives me, what inspires me. Acting had always been a thing I loved as a kid, that was fun and something I did for no other reason. I wanted to get back to that and New York gave me the chance to be around people a little more genuine about what acting is.”
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    Mostly, however, Henderson found himself growing from the life experiences that came with struggling to survive in one of the world’s most challenging cities.
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    Henderson lived in an East Village railroad apartment he shared with two friends. It was so cramped, Henderson slept on the living room floor on a foam mattress stored under the couch, which doubled as another bed. Another roommate made do with the kitchen floor. “There was no empty floor space in the apartment when we were all asleep. It was horrible,” Henderson recalls.
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    To pay the acting school’s annual tuition fee of $20,000, Henderson worked nights as a restaurant food runner – the guy who took the food to the fat-cat Wall Street types at the tables. It was one rung down from a waiter but without a working visa, Henderson says, it was the only job he could get.
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    He laughs when he recalls his first attempt at bartending in the city. Although he had no previous experience mixing drinks, Henderson leapt at the chance when a buddy asked him to fill in at a club.
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    “I was just making it up as I went along and everything was going fine. The place kept getting busier and busier, then at 2am they drew the curtains, dimmed the lights and everyone started having sex on the counter tops.
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    “I’m like, ‘Thanks for telling me about that part of the job, man’. I pretended not to notice, like I was totally cool with it. But I quit the next week.”
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    Against school rules, Henderson worked as an actor, starring as Hamlet in the off-Broadway play Ophelia Thinks Harder after an approach from its New Zealand producer. Henderson, a professional actor since the age of 13, admits he eventually found he wasn’t getting enough out of the classes at the Playhouse. They covered too much old ground and he found himself clashing more and more with tutors over technique. He left halfway through the two-year course but admits he never lost his love affair for the lifestyle and the life-lessons New York delivered.
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    “It was a huge challenge for me and I relished it,” he says. “I was learning so much living in New York, being surrounded by so many artists. I developed a real interest in that world. I hadn’t grown up in a really artistic family anyway, so it was a huge learning experience. I learned quite a few things at school but in the end it was more what I learned about life that affected me.”
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    On the strength of his role in Kick, a Los Angeles-based Australian producer befriended Henderson while he was in New York and promised to set up meetings for him on the West Coast. So after a spring in New York without the pressures of study, Henderson packed his bags for LA.
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    “It was relatively easy for me to get an agent,” says Henderson. “I had a reasonable body of work already and that’s the wonderful thing about New Zealand and Australia. They have this industry, with shows like Shortland Street, which is a wonderful place for young talent to express themselves, learn and use that as a platform.”
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    Still, his struggle for a serious breakthrough in LA didn’t get any easier. He couch-surfed his way around friends and acquaintances, selling some shares he’d invested in while living in Australia and borrowing money from his mum Lorraine to survive.
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    The low-point came in the days after his rental car was broken into and his New Zealand passport stolen on the eve of a screen test in Toronto. After his manager’s assistant, who is now his publicist, made a series of frantic calls to the New Zealand consulate begging for a temporary passport, Henderson eventually made it to Canada for an unsuccessful audition.
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    Detained at the border for interrogation by over-zealous officials, Henderson eventually straightened out a visa wrangle and returned to life in LA. But days later, the pick-up truck he’d just bought using a US$2000 loan from his mother was impounded after Henderson made an illegal left turn and police found the actor was driving without car insurance, which is mandatory in California.
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    “There I was, standing on the side of the road, with no transport to get to the audition and facing a US$800 fine to get my car back. I remember thinking, ‘This is ridiculous. Is this really worth it? f*ck it, I’m going home to get a job’.”
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    But Henderson also knew he couldn’t give up, not when he knew he was so close to a breakthrough. Sure, he was struggling, but there was a buzz around town for the latest hunk from Down Under.
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    Henderson met with Steven Spielberg for Colin Farrell’s role in Minority Report, got down to the final two to play James Dean in a TV bio-pic (James Franco won the part) and perhaps most impressively in terms of future box office clout, found himself up against Tobey Maguire for the starring role in last year’s blockbuster smash Spider-Man.
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    “Spider-Man came down to me and Tobey in the end and I knew that was a big deal as far as the industry was concerned,” recalls Henderson. “But not for me. I’m not a huge fan of that kind of thing. It was different for Tobey because he already had established himself as a good actor. But it would have taken me a long time to outgrow Spider-Man.”
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    By the time Windtalkers rolled around for consideration, the LA-weary Henderson had skipped town to hang out with his then-girlfriend, French actress Berenice Bejo, on the Prague set of her new film A Knight’s Tale, also starring old pal Heath Ledger.
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    “Most chances I get, I leave LA,” says Henderson. “Hollywood is pretty f*cking boring. Most people there are pretty boring. The whole Hollywood thing is a facade with a lot of insecure people and I don’t want to be around that kind of thing.”
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    Henderson admits he was a little nervous for those first few days on the Windtalkers’ set. After months of anonymity and surviving on cereal dinners, there he was sitting in a foxhole with Nicolas Cage, chewing the fat.
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    “At first I thought, ‘f*ck, here we go, a bunch of Hollywood acting dudes’. But they were nothing like that at all. They were all cool guys.”
    Henderson didn’t volunteer how much he was paid for his first Hollywood feature but after a little pushing, he concedes the cheque was for “high five figures”. (That’s in American dollars.)
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    Afterward, Henderson returned to Europe with Bejo before heading back to LA for more auditions around the time of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington D.C.
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    “I came home as soon as I could after September 11. That was a strange time to be away from your family. But I found people saying, ‘You’re not going back to the States, are you?’, and started to get freaked out about other people’s fears.
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    Dreamworks signed Henderson for The Ring so fast on his return to Hollywood, he had no time to dwell on the threat of terrorism and the widespread paranoia it caused.
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    He’d heard of the Japanese original from which The Ring was adapted but had never seen it. He didn’t know Watts either but they clicked from the first time they met.
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    “I remember thinking, ‘Phew, this is going to be good’. She is so nice and sweet. I got lucky again having someone like Naomi, who is Australian, to work with. They don’t take themselves quite as seriously as American actors. They have a little bit more of a sense of humour about it all and are more relaxed on set. So, in that Kiwi/Aussie way, we could give each other sh*t without anyone taking offence to it.”
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    So was he nervous in his first male lead? There’s a painfully long silence before Henderson eventually offers: “Yeah, a little bit. But I was ready for it too at that point. I’d spent so much time and energy trying to get the opportunity, so when it came, I was like, ‘Let’s have some fun’.”
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    With so many post-production elements to The Ring, Henderson says it was hard to get any sense of magic during the filming of his scenes. And he admits that the first time he saw a cut, he had visions of his career dying seven days after its release. “I was like, ‘Oh sh*t, I wish I hadn’t seen that’. There were definite problems but fortunately Dreamworks realised that too and they did a great job, right up to just before its release, to get it exactly where it needed to be.”
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    The studio also took no chances on publicity, sending a helicopter to whisk Henderson from the desert set of Torque to the industry release of The Ring, his first Hollywood red carpet premiere with his name in lights. Henderson had missed Windtalkers’ US launch a few months earlier because he was filming the Danish indie black comedy Skagerrak in Europe.
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    “I was a little nervous walking down that red carpet because I hadn’t seen the final product. All the media were asking me questions on the way in and all I could say was, ‘I hope it’s good’.”
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    Hearing the reaction of the audience that night not only made Henderson realise he may have a hit on his hands, it also reinforced why he’d put himself through such a roller-coaster ride to get there.
    “I remember sitting there and thinking this is exactly why I want to do this. You’re giving something and making people happy. You may not change people’s lives but you can certainly inspire them and give them an insight. That’s a really wonderful gift.”
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    For now, Henderson says he’s content travelling and indulging a new-found interest in photography and painting as he waits for the next script.
    He won’t say how much he was paid for The Ring, or Torque, for that matter. But he concedes he’s long since swapped the pick-up for a new Range Rover and no longer has to work for a couple of years if he doesn’t want to.
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    Henderson certainly doesn’t feel any pressure to take on just any old role from his William Morris agent David Adamson, an expatriate Kiwi who met Henderson by chance on a sailing trip a couple of years earlier. Adamson says that when an actor like Henderson comes along, someone with a work ethic to match his talent, “you grab it with both hands”.
    He talks about positioning Henderson in the same league as Daniel Day Lewis, Johnny Depp or Sean Penn, actors whose body of work is impressive but sparse.
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    “When Martin is on screen, saying a line or reacting to one, he’s the one I want to look at and to me that’s the star power of it. Martin wants to be working in this business for a very long time, so if there’s nothing right that’s he’s passionate about, then he doesn’t have to do it.”
    So, with a worldwide hit and the makings of another in the can, does Henderson think he’s made it?
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    “I feel like I’m starting. I’ve taken that first rung on the ladder. As for making it, I don’t think any such thing. I’ve certainly got an opportunity now to do what I want but I see my career as continually evolving.”
    As for Stuart Neilson, “weird” was about all Henderson could offer when asked if he ever thinks about the sulky teen and where all this fuss started. He later concedes, however, that the lessons he learned on Shortland Street have stayed with him.
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    “I think it was good to have that experience at that age because now I’m not seduced by the Hollywood life. I learned what all the bullsh*t was about. Now I have a certain line I’ve drawn and that’s my line. I’ll support the work things I do but as far as my personal life is concerned, I think it’s irrelevant.”
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    This article comes from The Big Idea
    http://www.thebigidea.co.nz
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    The URL for this story is:
    http://www.thebigidea.co.nz/article.php?sid=1395

    #1510
    Deej
    Participant

    Such a good interview, I don’t blame him for not telling how much he made from “The Ring” and “Torque” because it’s no one’s business lol.

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by Deej.
    #1518
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    LOL!
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    From February 2018…Mind the language! LOL!
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    Fellow Kiwi Anika Moa interviews Marty:
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    Anika Moa Unleashed
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    Anika is crazy/funny. LOL!
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    Marty dressed as “Nicole Kidman.”:
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    LOL! …I’d love to see her interview Marty again.
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    • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by Rachelle.
    #1523
    Deej
    Participant

    OMG Marty as a blonde 🤣

    #1524
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    LOL! He looks like his lovely mum.
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    I posted the following in the old forum in 2016 but the interview is from 2011…
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    The link is now defunct, but here’s the interview from 2011 when Marty first mentioned Sammy…
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    Marty talks to Teen Television about ‘OTM’…
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    Martin Henderson: Hunky Doc in Paradise:
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    By Lynn Barker on January 14, 2011 7:00:00 AM UTC

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    http://www.teentelevision.com/2011/01/14/m…doc-in-paradise
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    We’ve had our eye on hunky New Zealand-born actor Martin Henderson for a while. He was in Flyboys with the sizzlin’ hot James Franco, rode a mean motorcycle in the actioner Torque and took on ghosts in The Ring. Now Martin stars as a hunky doctor in an isolated South American jungle camp in the ABC TV series ‘Off the Map’.
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    We had a nice chat with the handsome actor at a network party in Pasadena, Ca. and noted how hot he looked all scruffy/cute in jeans and brown leather jacket with that dreamy, “just got out of the sack” stubble. He’s got that young “Indiana Jones” vibe.
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    TeenTelevision: Can you introduce your character to us?
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    Martin: Yeah. His name’s Ben Keaton and he founded this clinic with his wife and his wife is no longer in the picture. She is and she isn’t [sly grin]. He’s been there for about six years and it was their dream to provide health care to people who are unfortunate and didn’t have access to it. She has money so they were able to start the project but, in order to keep it going, we have to rely on some somewhat morally ambiguous means.
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    TeenTelevision: If she’s gone, you needed some additional docs, right?
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    Martin: Yeah. Added into that challenge is retaining doctors that are capable of working in that environment. A lot of doctors aren’t willing to work in a very unconventional way. Part of Ben’s challenge is to just keep doctors there because they keep disappearing. They’re like “Help! This is too hard”. Some of the best candidates are those with checkered pasts because they’re looking for something to prove.
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    The show is about that; about who really has the guts and perseverance to stick it out. It’s usually the people who really need to prove something to themselves or someone else. They all have this flawed, mysterious background that the show investigates.
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    TeenTelevision: Do you get to do any action, any Indiana Jones type adventuring?
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    Martin: There’s tons. There’s the zip-lining, we have mudslides, underwater scuba operations.
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    TeenTelevision: Do you actually do that?
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    Martin: Oh yeah, sure. There’s a lot of stuff on the ocean, cliff jumping. We have an anaconda in one episode, a giant one. It grabs a couple of people. Also, we’ve got the infectious diseases and trying to diagnose things that you don’t have the equipment to make a snap diagnosis. There’s a lot of trial and error. You almost have to be a car mechanic. Is it the radiator or something else? I think that ups the stakes.
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    TeenTelevision: So practicing medicine in these third world country situations is the biggest challenge?
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    Martin: They are all in situations where life throws you curve balls and the answer isn’t that clear at the beginning. The goal of the characters is to provide health care and the means with which to achieve that sometimes require you to choose the path that may be questionable both in and out of bed.
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    TeenTelevision: How are relationships in the jungle different from the doctor relationships in Seattle etc.?
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    Martin: At their heart, they are probably the same. Human beings, no matter where they are, those drives are born of the same instincts; needing companionship or physical comfort or emotional connection. The core of the characters in that regard are universal. Everyone will relate to that.
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    TeenTelevision: So how will the show be unique as far as these isolated docs’ relationships?
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    Martin: In this situation, they’re a little more vulnerable and confused so I think it’s in times like that that we make emotional decisions that we wouldn’t necessarily make if we were in our typical environment. Then the characters have to pay the consequences. If there is a [hook-up] what is motivating that? Is it loneliness, is it convenience or need? It might be more convenient to choose a lover that’s within ten miles. But that person might still be a good match.
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    TeenTelevision: You take your shirt off a lot in the show. We’re not complaining but is that in your contract?
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    Martin: [laughs]. It’s not. In fact, I’ve managed to convince them that it’s not as necessary as they might possible feel in a couple of episodes. I don’t think it’s necessary and sometimes feels a little gratuitous. If I’m swimming in a waterfall, that’s fine. If I’m covered in blood and I need to change my shirt, fine.
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    TeenTelevision: Who is in line for a romance with you on the show?
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    Martin: I have a bit of a romance with Rachelle [Lefevre of Twilight], her character, I should say. My character has a romance with Ryan and there are other intrigues going on but my relationship with Ryan, Rachelle’s character is complicated enough.
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    TeenTelevision: And then your wife comes back?
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    Martin: [grins] Well, I don’t know about that. I don’t know if she does.
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    TeenTelevision: Why choose to do TV and TV with a big ensemble of characters?
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    Martin: I did a lot of TV growing up in New Zealand then Australia then when I came to the States, it was very clear that I didn’t want to do that. I didn’t want to be locked down to one place, one spot. I wanted to travel and do different roles in different genres and I did that for about ten years.
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    I’d be in a hotel room with room service in a foreign city trying to talk to my family in a different time zone without my dog and I thought, “Is this the life I want for the next ten or twenty years?” No, I’d like to find a show that I like that I could commit to. I had to know I wouldn’t get bored and would have fun with it.
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    TeenTelevision: And this was that show?
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    Martin: Yeah. I sat down with Shonda [Rhimes, creator and show runner] and she pitched me this idea and I thought it would keep me occupied and happy and the fact that we’re shooting in Hawaii was great. A lot of wonderful things came together.
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    TeenTelevision: So is your dog with you in Hawaii?
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    Martin: Oh yeah. That’s very important.
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    TeenTelevision: What kind of dog is he?
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    Martin: He’s a mix of a German Shepard and a Golden Retriever. His name is Sammy and he’s wonderful. He was named after my first cat actually.
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    TeenTelevision: Is all the doctor jargon hard for you?
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    Martin: It’s been okay. I do look at some of the words and be like “Oh man! Myalisis, subdural”, but we are fortunate to have a great staff of medical advisors. Whenever a script comes out, every medical term is referenced with a link to online dictionaries so we can learn about it. We have lots of help.
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    #1525
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    Here are a couple of archived video interviews via YouTube–one from ‘The Ring’ and one from ‘Torque’–both with our yummy younger Kiwi. LOL!…
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    ‘The Ring’ Interview:
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    ‘Torque’ Interview:
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    #1526
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    Here’s an old Marty interview from 2008–the type of interview with short, fun questions and quick, thoughtful answers.
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    From years ago, thanks to Eva–here’s the “30 days of fashion” article (originally posted in old forum under ‘New article/Interview’/May 2008):
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    http://www.30daysoffashion.com/exclusive/c…artin_henderson
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    This was the intro for the series:
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    5 Stylemakers, 30 Questions
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    Just off an overnight flight from Paris and a day before he was heading off to Madrid, renowned and remarkably affable photographer Peter Lindbergh arrived in Smashbox studio in L.A. to shoot portraits of five celebrity stylemakers. The five were culled from a list of names our editors offered as stars with distinctive, attention-worthy style and about whom they thought our readers would be fascinated to know more.
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    So after a signature double espresso, some warm greetings and encouraging conversation, Peter Lindbergh produced these five exclusive portraits for 30DaysofFashion.com while we, in a riff off of those much-emailed, utterly distracting “Get to Know Your Friends” surveys, asked each celebrity 30 style-revealing question they were only too happy to answer.
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    Martin Henderson
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    Rugged good looks only get you so far. That’s why New Zealander Martin Henderson is doing his damndest to flex his acting muscles. He scored stateside attention with roles in The Ring and Little Fish and was set to reprise Brad Pitt’s role in the TV version of Mr. & Mrs. Smith, but disappointingly the show wasn’t picked up. Dusting himself off, he’s set to appear in Battle for Seattle. Keep an eye out.
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    Q: What is your morning routine?
    Meditate (try), breakfast, shower, dress, work out.
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    Q: Sport most likely to kill an afternoon watching or playing?
    Sailing
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    Q: What was the last film you saw at the cinema?
    Hoax
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    Q: TV show most likely to TiVo?
    Planet Earth
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    Q: Always with you (besides cell phone)?
    Sense of humour
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    Q: Favorite cuisine?
    Fusion but always love a good meat pie from home.
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    Q: What is your go-to color?
    Green
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    Q: How many pairs of shoes, roughly?
    8
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    Q: How would you define your style?
    All over the place
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    Q: CD or music download in the heaviest rotation?
    Kings of Leon
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    Q: What kind of car do you drive?
    Prius
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    Q: Favorite store?
    Anywhere the sales people don’t harass you.
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    Q: Guiltiest indulgence?
    Restaurants
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    Q: Article of clothing that reminds you of yourself?
    Flip flops
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    Q: If you could go anywhere in the world on vacation, where would you go?
    Sailing around the Greek Islands.
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    Q: What’s on the floor of your closet?
    Two dumbbells, a travel suitcase and dust.
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    Q: Favorite designer?
    Helmut Lang
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    Q: Where would you retire to?
    New Zealand
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    Q: Favorite fashion period in history?
    Early 60’s Italian
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    Q: Spring, winter, fall or summer?
    Spring and Fall
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    Q: Favorite saying?
    “Forget yourself”
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    Q: Favorite smells?
    Rain on hot cement, extinguished matches.
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    Q: Are you a morning person or a night person?
    Morning
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    Q: Room in your house you like best?
    Bed room
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    Q: What did you want to be when you were little?
    Big
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    Q: Can’t live without______?
    Making mistakes
    .
    Q: Best recent purchase?
    Prius and a corduroy jacket for my little nephew
    .
    Q: Beach, country or city?
    All
    .
    Q: What inspires you?
    Truth, beauty and adventure (puke)
    .
    Q: What’s on your fashion wish list?
    A bitchin’ leather jacket
    .

    BONUS QUESTIONS!
    .
    Q: Next project?
    Trying to figure that out.
    .
    Q: What was it like being photographed by Peter Lindbergh?
    Quick and easy.
    .
    Photo that accompanied the article:
    .

    .

    ‘Battle in Seattle,’ not Battle FOR Seattle.
    .

    :

    #1527
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    From 2016…One of my fave interviews…’Grey’s Anatomy’ focused but so much more…
    .
    .
    Martin Henderson returns to hospital
    .
    By Leena Tailor
    .
    9:00 AM Friday Jan 8, 2016
    .
    Return to Hospital
    .
    Actor Martin Henderson talks to Leena Tailor about why he once wanted to give up television work and why he remains resolutely Kiwi despite his Hollywood success.
    .
    “I’m a bit ADD, in case you haven’t noticed,” quips Martin Henderson, flitting around his trailer on the Los Angeles set of Grey’s Anatomy. One minute he’s asking whether he should grow his hair back, while changing into his television scrubs; the next he’s cleaning the kitchen sink while contemplating the key to success, and the dwindling number of summers he has left to learn how to kite-surf.
    .
    His philosophical ponderings, sound-tracked by UB40 and Bob Marley, are interrupted by a knock, signalling it’s time for makeup – much to the surprise of a publicist, who observes he already looks like he’s been “through the works”.
    .
    “No, wait till you see me in makeup – you’ll be so impressed,” he laughs.
    .
    Rewind two years and Henderson would have felt eased to know such compliments lay ahead as he mused over his upcoming 40th birthday at a Tourism New Zealand event in Beverly Hills, confessing that the life of a Hollywood actor is inevitably accompanied by looking in the mirror and “hoping you don’t have new wrinkles.”
    .
    Today, it’s clear he need not have worried.
    .
    Ageing aside, after 15 years in Hollywood, Henderson, 41, has risen above rejection, heartache, grief and, at times, becoming the subject of tabloid fodder, to reach a professional peak which just saw him grace the big screen in Everest, wrap playing Jennifer Garner’s husband in Miracles From Heaven and debut his biggest American television gig yet, as hot new doctor, Nathan Riggs, on Grey’s Anatomy.
    .
    He’s living the dream – albeit one he didn’t realise he had when he moved to LA at 25, visions of movie-making emblazoned on his mind.
    .
    “When I came to America I never wanted to do television again,” he admits, settling on to the couch. “I grew up doing TV and it’s a compromise – there’s not enough time to rehearse to a point where you iron out all the problems, so you shoot from the hip and hope for the best, but with film there was a chance to get into it, in a way I’d never experienced.
    .
    “Once I tasted that I went, ‘Right, I’m never doing TV again.’ And I was 25, so the idea of being tied down to one job for more than six months gave me the creeps. I had opportunities and ran from them, fast.
    .
    “But after a few years, I was in a hotel room in Vancouver doing Battle in Seattle with Charlize Theron, Ray Liotta and Woody Harrelson – great cast, lead role, subject matter I thought was politically important and just a cool job. I was living the dream I had when I left New Zealand, but by my early 30s I realised that was not a sustainable way of life for me. There were times I’d be away from my dog or girlfriend and it’s just a sh*tty way to live. Always being away started to wear me down and as much as I loved the jobs, I didn’t want work to take precedent over my life.
    .
    “I realised I needed to go back on my idea of never doing TV.”
    .
    Cue roles on Off The Map, Secrets & Lies, The Red Road and now popular medical drama, Grey’s Anatomy.
    .
    His arrival caused controversy with fans still reeling from the death of their beloved McDreamy (Patrick Dempsey), who exited the series last April.
    .
    Upon Henderson’s casting he was immediately labelled “McDreamy’s replacement”, yet his role was undeveloped when he took the job following a meeting with TV superpower Shonda Rhimes, who previously hired him for Off The Map.
    .
    It wasn’t until his first table read that Henderson had any inkling of his character’s name or background.
    .
    “Shonda offered me the job and I thought, ‘Great show, shoots in LA, ticks all the boxes … Cool.’
    .
    “I told my agent I was interested and he asked what the role was. I was like, ‘You know what? She didn’t actually mention a role.’
    .
    “So I called Shonda and said, ‘I’m honoured, grateful and thinking about saying ‘Yes’, but have no idea what I’m saying ‘Yes,’ to!’
    .
    “She was like, ‘We’ll figure that out.’
    .
    “The first time I read anything about my character, was out-loud in front of the writers, producers, crew and cast. It was so nerve-wracking.”
    .
    In addition to having one of Hollywood’s most mighty television producers develop a character for him, he was further delighted when asked to keep his Kiwi accent, confessing that mastering the American accent has been a career-long struggle.
    .
    “Then I asked if I could do full-on Kiwi, like Flight of the Conchords, and they were like, ‘Maybe not… we do want people to understand you’.”
    .
    Although Henderson had lunched with his “lovely, wonderful and so candid” co-star Ellen Pompeo prior to starting work, he was relieved to be welcomed with hugs and excitement from the rest of the tight-knit cast.
    .
    Called in a week early, his first day was a blur, but he does recall a brief flashback to Shortland Street’s Ferndale.
    .
    “It was a little surreal being in a hospital again,” he grins. “I did have a moment, standing there as crew were setting up where I looked around and went, ‘Wow, I’m on a hospital set … it’s the same thing, just thousands of miles away on the other side of the Pacific. I’m doing the same thing!'”
    .
    Back then, he was a teen, quietly pursuing a passion most kids would have scoffed at, the seed of which was planted on stage at Birkenhead Primary School.
    .
    He was 10 years old and had just completed his first play, walking off stage on a high that would shape the rest of his life.
    .
    “I remember lying in bed and I would never have admitted this to anyone because of the whole tall poppy thing – I was aware if I vocalised my dreams there would be someone quick to tell me I couldn’t or shouldn’t – but I had just done that play and thought, ‘Acting … that was fun!’
    .
    “Of course, as a little kid you go, ‘Hollywood!’ just like a boy scoring his first try goes, ‘All Blacks!’
    .
    “Then in 4th form at Westlake [Boys’ High School], I had done my first TV show [Strangers], but [acting] wasn’t something that was encouraged. I was trying to hide it. It was a rugby and rowing school, so I focused on academics. The acting, I was almost ashamed of.”
    .
    His former teacher, Louis Borok, admits that after Henderson ditched his French homework to audition for Shortland Street, he told him he was unlikely to make a career as an actor. “So much for my ability to spot talent.”
    .
    But spurred on by encouragement from another teacher and the unwavering support of his mum, Veronica, Henderson, whose parents divorced when he was 5, clung to his acting dreams.
    .
    He started on Shortland Street at 17 as Stuart Neilson, rapidly becoming a teen heart-throb – gracing magazine covers, bedroom walls and experiencing a level of fandom these days reserved more for pop stars.
    .
    “I remember driving him somewhere in the early days and as we parked, a hoard of screaming teenage girls began banging on the windows,” recalls Michele Priest, Shortland Street’s head of assistant directors. “It was unlike anything anyone had ever seen in New Zealand. He handled it incredibly well, but it was surreal seeing him mobbed. It was then that many of us knew he was set for very big things.”
    .
    It wasn’t just his star power that was evident in the early days.
    .
    Longtime Shortland Street actor Michael Galvin (Chris Warner) recalls being captivated by his co-star’s talent. “I remember watching early episodes to critique my performance and being completely preoccupied by Martin’s scenes. Given how self-absorbed actors are meant to be, the fact that I was distracted from watching my work by a teenager’s performance made me realise he had something special in terms of talent.”
    .
    After three years, Henderson headed to Australia, where he starred on Home and Away and Sweat, befriending co-star Heath Ledger who would later join him in Sydney before the pair tackled Hollywood together.
    .
    Henderson went via New York, studying at The Neighborhood Playhouse School of the Theatre, then landing in LA.
    .
    His first year was gruelling. Friends were scarce, he felt like a “charity case” couch-surfing his way around town. He had to accept money from Ledger to survive and his professional life was a stream of rejection.
    .
    Countless times he questioned his talent and inched towards hopping on a plane home, where dad Ian lovingly reminded him he could continue acting with ease.
    .
    “All the rejection, heartache, disappointment and near-misses bring the inevitable questioning of, ‘Why haven’t I got a job yet? Maybe I’m only good in New Zealand?’
    .
    “Your self-doubt starts to erode your confidence, then you question your dreams. That’s the hardest thing – finding self-belief in the face of all the rejection and holding on to what you know you’re capable of.
    .
    “It’s tricky because you don’t want to get resentful and have a ‘f*** you’ attitude. The demands that puts on your personal development is the most challenging thing – finding the humility to go, ‘I’m not going to take it personally,’ then staying committed to doing classes, working hard and remembering why you’re there.”
    .
    Refusing to succumb to the Hollywood hurdles that frequently churn through actors and spit them back to their homelands, Henderson persevered and landed roles in The Ring, Torque, Bride and Prejudice and Britney Spears’ saucy Toxic video.
    .
    Smokin’ Aces, Little Fish and Battle in Seattle followed.
    .
    It was around this time that the demands of hopscotching between film sets started to weigh on Henderson and as he mulled over his future came the biggest jolt – the shattering news that Ledger had passed away, due to an accidental overdose.
    .
    Devastated, he left LA, unsure if he would return.
    .
    “There was a while after Heath passed away that I went home for a bit. I did a film in Sydney, a play in Melbourne, then a film in New Zealand, but I was just questioning it all because we came over here together and it was like, ‘Yeah! Hollywood!’
    .
    “So after that I was like, ‘Man, what’s it all about?’ I stepped back from my career and wasn’t terribly interested in it.
    .
    “But eventually I started getting back on track with what I wanted – that aspiration I had from a young age. I always had that dream of, ‘If I’m going to act, Hollywood is what I want to do,’ so it was about honouring that and realising that to not commit and follow through would be betraying myself.
    .
    “And after that loss it was important to spend time back home. I love home and when I’m there I just feel good. I needed to reconnect and be around family.”
    .
    Another knock summons Henderson to rehearsals, after which he’s whisked to the Operating Room to practise his next surgical procedure, intense concentration sweeping over his face.
    .
    In between takes, the Grey’s cast light up at mention of “McKiwi”.
    .
    “He’s a peach!” says Caterina Scorsone (Amelia Shepherd). “He’s been a great addition to the show. So sweet and very generous.”
    .
    It’s not just on Grey’s that Henderson quickly made his mark. Whether it’s his third form French teacher Joan Farrell – who remembers him as “a focused, nice, well-balanced young man,” – or his co-stars, the Kiwi charismatically leaves a trail of good impressions.
    .
    “He’s just such a sweet man, really committed and always upbeat,” says Everest’s Jake Gyllenhaal. “Any time an actor talks about another actor I feel like I’m on The Howard Stern Show, going, ‘He pisses lemonade and sh*ts rainbows! He’s the best!’ But the thing is, I really do like him.”
    .
    We meet again three days later at a French cafe in Miracle Mile. He arrives late, checks the time before deciding what strength coffee to order (a cortado), puts his phone in his pocket then chats away, graciously ignoring the fact he’s 30 minutes behind for his next meeting.
    .
    Like his close friend Ledger, Henderson, too, could have once fallen prey to the dangerous side of showbiz.
    .
    He “loved alcohol a great deal … too much” and, at 23, recalls a teacher he greatly respected declaring he had a beautiful life ahead if he worked hard … and stopped drinking.
    .
    It wasn’t the first time he’d been called out on his “excessive” boozing, but her words stuck and eventually, at 27, Henderson quit alcohol.
    .
    “I did party a bit when I first came to LA, which is its own trap. The celebrity and Hollywood culture is a whole world that becomes all-consuming. You see lots of people get here and think that’s what it’s all about.
    .
    “People think if you’re at the right party or in the right circle that’s an avenue to something, but I’ve never seen it as anything other than a distraction. I’ve consciously gone, ‘I don’t want anything to do with that.’
    .
    “I love my work, but I’ve always tried to keep my life similar to how it would be back home – sailing, hiking, cooking, my dog, my friends. This world is so abnormal that, in a way, it’s not reality and it’s important not to get caught up in it.”
    .
    It’s not just the partying and glamour of Tinseltown that Henderson has actively avoided, but fame in general.
    .
    He would rather be biking the Santa Monica mountains than cruising red carpets and he’s more often found surfing in Malibu than posting selfies on Instagram.
    .
    If his media presence has been intensified by Grey’s, he’s unfazed.
    .
    “I experienced fame, albeit on a smaller scale, in New Zealand when I was still forming my identity. I was 17, on magazine covers and people would write stuff about me. I felt pressure to embody what others were thinking and after a while that felt unsustainable and unhealthy.
    .
    “I felt that part of it was bullsh*t – the celebrity culture. People love to read about who’s hooking up with who and a lot of the time it’s nonsense.
    .
    “By the time I moved to America I knew I didn’t want to get embroiled in all that, because then you’re living through other people’s eyes. When you have fame, people drag you down and think you’re sh*t or build you up and think you’re incredible and the truth is neither, so I don’t ever want to get invested in anyone else’s opinion.”
    .
    It’s curiously ironic that perhaps the least fame-hungry Kiwi actor in Hollywood has found himself in the most memorable tabloid headlines.
    .
    In 2004 it was him getting hot and heavy with Britney Spears, recently it was reported he was consoling Jennifer Garner following her marriage split and who can forget that time he was splashed across global media labelled as Demi Moore’s “new, younger man”?
    .
    “Someone sent me an email with an article when we were photographed leaving a general store in Connecticut with some cheese that we were taking back to a friend’s house for lunch,” he recalls. “I was like, ‘Oh God, I can see how this is going to become someone else’s idea of something.’
    .
    “But I didn’t see another image. I would hear snippets of people’s opinions, but I never read anything or saw an image and that’s what I mean about not wanting to get invested in other people’s take on stuff. I never want to be influenced by someone’s opinion, positive or negative.”
    .
    So, did he date her?
    .
    “Demi? No, no, no! But what happens is you deny it and they go, ‘Martin insists they’re just friends,’ and that becomes fuel to create speculation that it’s now a clandestine relationship. Now it’s a story that we’re sneaking around.
    .
    “So if I say ‘Yes,’ I confirm a lie and if I say ‘No,’ it creates a lie as well.”
    .
    He shrugs off whether such experiences make him more wary of who he’s seen out-and-about with, or if his awareness of public attention was heightened while filming Miracles From Heaven with Garner.
    .
    “I just live my life. Jennifer and I hung out a bit and I think someone saw us at dinner and there was a thing about, ‘They’re having dinner!’
    .
    “But I made a conscious effort not to read anything because there was a huge amount of tabloid energy circling around her relationship with Ben [Affleck] and I didn’t want to bring that into my working relationship with her.”
    .
    Contrary to those romantic headlines, Henderson is single. He’d love to get married and become a father, having been smitten with his Miracles From Heaven daughters, and he is the proud uncle of three nephews, the eldest of whom he’s just enjoyed introducing to Disneyland.
    .
    However, he’s wary of pinning his future hopes on parenthood. “I’ve always wanted kids, but I never felt ready. I wasn’t mature enough to have them earlier. It would’ve felt more of a burden, whereas today I’m at an age where spending time with kids or my nephews is wonderful.
    .
    “But I’m not going to rush out and do it for the sake of it. I don’t think having a family is the answer to anything, but more a complement to life. I’d rather find the right woman first, but life’s funny – I might find someone and they can’t have kids.
    .
    “So I don’t want to get hung up on the idea because then if I met someone who couldn’t, I’d feel like I was being denied something.”
    .
    In a town where headlines centre on the latest showbiz break-ups, Henderson’s also cautious of the type of woman he will consider dating.
    .
    Right now, that means no actresses.
    .
    “There’s an actress I was keen on,” he shares. “But do you really want to marry someone who’s doing the exact same thing you do?
    .
    “If you marry someone and love them, you support whatever they want to do with their life. That means I would have a vested interest in having my wife constantly leave me.
    .
    “I don’t want to be questioning whether I want my wife to be successful. That stuff comes up so often when two actors are married. You get professional jealousies or insecurities unless you’re both working, but if you’re both working you’re not going to see each other and the relationship will struggle, then if you throw kids into that…
    .
    “I’m not saying I won’t ever marry an actress, but in this case I did go, ‘I’m not going to date that girl because ultimately that’s not what I want.’ I think you have to broaden your sights and cast a wide net for women from all walks of life and continents.”
    .
    In the meantime, he’s the “happiest I’ve ever been” and relishing a job that allows him to go home every night, but still grants the opportunity to make films in his hiatus.
    .
    He misses New Zealand deeply, but heads back frequently, cherishing every moment, “even if my sister and I are fighting constantly, like we have since we were kids”.
    .
    And while farewelling family leaves him “slightly depressed” during his first week back Stateside, his Kiwi ties remain strong, hanging with fellow acting expats like Kieren Hutchison and Cliff Curtis, watching every All Blacks game, helping other Kiwi actors transition to LA – and once moving into a house because it had a feijoa tree.
    .
    “I love America and I’m grateful for everything it’s given me. I love my life and friends here and I’m making a really good home.
    .
    “But nothing beats that feeling when I’m home – whether it’s turning on the news or a talk show and going, ‘Yeah … there’s my people.’
    .
    “The smell of the New Zealand bush and the sound of the Waitakeres – it’s in my blood and that connection is something I will always have because I need it. I need it in a sense of, that’s when I feel like who I really am.”
    .
    .
    .
    The latest season of Grey’s Anatomy is currently showing on TVNZ OnDemand and will also air on TV2 later this year.
    .
    – Canvas
    .
    By Leena Tailor
    .
    .

    ^^^^^^^^ THIS is the type of quality interview all the others should aspire to (NZ Herald/Canvas). LOL! It’s thorough and thoughtful–shows Marty’s luster as well as his vulnerability and doesn’t resort to rehashing other articles or rumors. Perhaps this is an interview that only his native New Zealand could have produced. LOL! And maybe Variety.
    .
    Love Jake’s quote/comment about Marty…
    .
    It’s not just on Grey’s that Henderson quickly made his mark. Whether it’s his third form French teacher Joan Farrell – who remembers him as “a focused, nice, well-balanced young man,” – or his co-stars, the Kiwi charismatically leaves a trail of good impressions.
    .
    “He’s just such a sweet man, really committed and always upbeat,” says Everest’s Jake Gyllenhaal. “Any time an actor talks about another actor I feel like I’m on The Howard Stern Show, going, ‘He pisses lemonade and sh*ts rainbows! He’s the best!’ But the thing is, I really do like him.”
    .
    .
    .
    Jake does get one thing wrong–Marty doesn’t sh*t rainbows–he sh*ts ice cream. LOL!
    .
    Speaking of rehash…
    .

    Former Shortland Street star Martin Henderson back on the hospital ward:
    .
    Back on the Ward
    .


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    • This reply was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by Rachelle.
    • This reply was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by Rachelle.
    #1530
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    You can tell Marty brings all things energy and fun (experimental and adventurous) wherever he goes–but he knows when work is work. He’s a wonderful actor. Of course he does. LOL!
    .
    Brilliant NZ Herald interview. Marty seems to respect, appreciate and reward those in his life…Good man…He sh*ts ice cream, Jake. LOL!
    .
    I’ll deduct points for the newspaper cover referring to him as “The New McDreamy.” Marty is second to none. To hell with all of that “2.0” sh*t. All in all–lovely informative interview. LOL! I saw the cover on the IG page of the person who conducted the interview (Leena Tailor). Let me find it for you. LOL! Here it is:
    .

    .

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by Rachelle.
    #1537
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    Press from March 2016…’Miracles from Heaven’ interviews…
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    Martin Henderson talks about MIRACLES FROM HEAVEN:
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    .

    .
    Marty’s interview with Hope 103.2 out of Australia…Have a listen at the podcast/audio (click beneath first image)…or just read….
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    “Life’s Full Of Miracles From Heaven”- An Interview With Actor Martin Henderson:
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    Life’s Full of Miracles
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    Eugenio Derbez & Martin Henderson Talk ‘Miracles From Heaven’:
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    Miracles From Heaven Interview w/ Martin Henderson:
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    • This reply was modified 8 months, 1 week ago by Rachelle.
    • This reply was modified 8 months, 1 week ago by Rachelle.
    #1538
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    From 2016…
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    Evie Sullivan hautnah: ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ | Martin Henderson:

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    • This reply was modified 8 months, 1 week ago by Rachelle.
    #1556
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    From 2016…
    .

    Dubai Eye 103.8’s Georgia Tolley catches up with Grey’s Anatomy’s Martin Henderson:
    .

    .

    Nice interview. And of course his biscuits are exceptional! LOL!
    .

    #1560
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    This is more an article than an interview–penned by our man Marty himself for Gamesail…The link is now defunct but the good news is that I copied the article and saved the pics that were with the article…from February 2010…
    .
    Marty wrote this after his holiday with luxury yacht company Gamesail. (Marty writes well–love the description–not to mention that shirtless image):
    .
    Time Flies When You Are Having Fun
    Posted On: Tuesday, 16 February 2010

    .
    Personal Log by Martin Henderson, February 2010:
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    http://gamesail.co.nz/news.asp?pageID=2145…efID=2141738776
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    .
    .
    .
    Full blog/article (see link for additional pics):
    .
    Time Flies When You Are Having Fun
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    Posted On: Tuesday, 16 February 2010
    .
    Personal Log by Martin Henderson, February 2010.
    .
    .
    I don’t even know where to begin…. After more than 30 years of sailing in and around the Hauraki Gulf holidaying with family and friends in all sorts of boats I thought I’d done it all. But this recent trip on board Te Ngakau a Kupe was by far the most spectacular and enjoyable sailing holiday I’ve ever had.
    .
    Friends had come down to New Zealand from as far away as Los Angeles and London to join Kiwi family members and friends for a 2 week holiday. It was delightful to have so many loved ones together to share the experience and everyone remarked at what a fabulous time they had. The tasteful, spacious interior and deck space meant we never felt cramped or climbing over one another as is so often the case on yachts.
    .
    We took off from the Viaduct with our skipper Andy (“Spoon”) and enjoyed sailing around the gulf to Waiheke and then out to the top of the Coromandel. Some of us went ashore and took in the beauty of the Fletcher’s bay to Stony bay walk through untouched native bush while the others remained on board to try their hand at fishing.
    .
    With the ability to both sail and motor efficiently we had so many options available to us. Our time was spent mostly around the back of Great Barrier and down to the Mercury Islands and the Eastern side of the Coromandel. We just cruised to wherever curiosity or desire led us. If the conditions suited we would leisurely sail to our destination taking our time and soaking up the magnificent scenery. Everyone had brought along a collection of books to devour but the ever changing sea and landscapes were a constant distraction and soon we were lulled into a hypnotic trance letting it all pass by and wash over us.
    .

    No request was too much for Andy to accommodate. If it was a great surf we wanted he would just point the boat where the swells were and motored up behind the break for us to jump off and start paddling. Our days were both lazy and event filled.
    .
    Having all the fishing and dive gear on board including the air compressor provided us with most meals made up of freshly caught snapper or scallops that we would dive for and grill on the back of the boat straight from the water. The guests from overseas could hardly believe the ease of “hunting and gathering”. Of course I acted nonchalantly as though this was the typical Kiwi way but I gotta say Andy’s secret spots and fishing know-how ensured a feasting experience that I had never enjoyed before. The spacious and well appointed kitchen was also an added bonus when it came time to prepare all the meals and to fit 2 or 3 people in there at once was another boating novelty!!
    .
    When we weren’t stuffing our faces with fresh seafood the days passed with Kayaking around unspoilt coastline getting a close up of the rugged cliffs and coves with the gnarled Pohutukawa limbs hanging overhead.
    .
    Some of us would paddle into remote coves and lie peacefully in untouched tranquillity snoozing the afternoon away or head in land and discover the numerous walking tracks that snake through the conservation land.
    .
    One of the most memorable experiences of the entire trip was probably the 5 hour trek from Harataonga bay to Whangapoua that undulates up and over the headlands between the idyllic stream-fed bays that lie between these two extraordinary beaches. It’s damn nice to be able to throw your dirty laundry in the washing machine on the boat once you get back on board too!
    .
    For those who wanted it, each day was another opportunity for adventure, whether it was climbing up to gushing waterfalls or digging a steaming hot bath on the sands of Hot Water Beach there were endless places to discover. Or for those who just wanted to work on their tan a bean bag would be dragged up to the bow.
    .
    The prolific bird and marine life was a constant spectacle ever reminding us that this natural wonder must be respected and protected in order to not go the way of so many other once pristine places around the world. Every now and then a pod of dolphins would surround the boat and entertain us with their leaps and playful antics.
    .
    Our biggest problem was how to slow the days down as each night seemed to arrive too quickly bringing sad truth to that age old adage, “Time flies when you’re having fun”. Still, whatever sadness felt was gently offset and washed away by a piping hot shower in the roomy en suite before falling asleep in the luxurious queen size bed with the milky way shining through the hatch above.
    .
    I could go on and on. Simply. It was the BEST!
    Thank you so much for an unforgettable time.
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    #1562
    Rachelle
    Keymaster

    From 2017
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    .
    Martin Henderson: when US immigration locked me up:
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    When Immigration Locked Me Up

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    STEVE KILGALLON
    Last updated 05:00, April 9 2017
    .
    It’s May 2000. Martin Henderson is flying from London back to Los Angeles, three years of Californian toil finally delivering up a screentest for Sam Raimi’s big-screen re-telling of the Spiderman story.
    .
    But when Henderson arrives at LAX, home to the world’s least friendly immigration agents, things don’t go well. He’s kept in an interview room for eight hours, fingerprinted, interrogated and told he has to leave the country the next day.
    .
    Until then, it’s an overnight stay in a detention cell with some Brazilians and Chinese. The Chinese talk Mandarin to him all night in the vain hope that the English-speaking white man can help solve their immigration woes.
    .
    Then the whole lot are handcuffed and chained together and led through LAX to be sent to their respective homes – just as NZ2 arrives from Auckland and disgorges 400 Kiwis into the baggage hall. “I thought ‘this looks so bad’ and I’m asking ‘can you take these handcuffs off’ and they’re saying ‘I’m sorry sir, this is protocol’,” says Henderson sunnily, with the delivery of a practised raconteur. “Yeah, that was a funny call to my agent the next morning to postpone the Spiderman screentest a few days”.
    .
    Henderson’s first few years in Los Angeles were this curious juxtaposition of five-star hotels and couch-surfing, business class air tickets and labouring jobs. He tells his stories with the relish and context of someone in the much happier position of 17 years residence, a green card, dog, home, girlfriend, and of late, a steady gig on a highly-rating TV show.
    .
    Tem Morrison, who has known the slings and arrows of Hollywood, told a colleague that Henderson had hit the jackpot when he was cast as a regular in the soap opera Grey’s Anatomy: it was regular, reasonably secure, well paid, and prime time.
    .
    This Henderson mulls over. “For the first 15 years in this town, I didn’t want that consistency,” he says. “It didn’t gel with the kind of lifestyle I wanted.”
    .
    He’d come to Hollywood to make movies: he’d done plenty of television in Australia and New Zealand (most famously, of course, on Shortland Street) before moving to the US in 1997. He was confident there was plenty of that work back home if he needed it. And he liked the idea of travelling the world, spending a few months at a time in a place, moving on to the next thing. He suspects if he’d grown up at the right time, he would have been diagnosed with ADHD, or something similar: as a kid, he was always restless. “I had,” he says, “a pretty firm idea of what I didn’t want to do.”
    .
    Sometimes, he says, he gets asked by another of the endless trail of Kiwis heading from Auckland to Los Angeles how he did it. “But it’s so different now. It’s such a different industry. The movie industry has shrunk. There’s not as much work: it’s harder now.” The “whole diversity thing”, he says neutrally, makes it much harder now to get work as a white male like himself.
    .
    Henderson first arrived in the US – via his television apprenticeship here and in Australia, on shows such as Echo Point and Big Sky – on a student visa to study acting at New York’s Neighborhood​ Playhouse drama school. An audition for a movie with Sony convinced him it was time to move coasts.
    .
    This is where the LAX story has its complicated beginnings. His mate Heath Ledger had loaned him his car to go get a haircut, at the studio’s behest, because he looked too scruffy. While he was in the barber’s chair, someone broke into the car and stole Henderson’s filofax (he grins, as he should, at the very mention), which held his return plane ticket to New York and his New Zealand passport, complete with his student visa.
    .
    So he went to Toronto for the screentest (didn’t get it) on a temporary passport, and on his return was duly detained, interrogated – a tricky situation given he wasn’t meant to be working at all – and told not to try come back without a new visa. That chapter ends with Henderson in a backpackers hostel in Vancouver on his 25th birthday, waiting on his paperwork, and waking up one morning to see a guy he used to play soccer with making toast. “Oh yeah, bro, I heard you’re doing really well,” said the mate. Henderson laughs.
    .
    But in a way, he was. The carrot, he says, was always dangling. On that trip, he was taken by limousine to LAX, flown in business class and put up in a five-star hotel. “And a week later, I am back to eating tuna and staying on someone’s couch. But in some ways, it was like, okay, if I plug away, this is a reality”.
    .
    It was this Canadian escapade that left a red flag in the US immigration system that would eventually trip Henderson up at LAX, and send him back to London for a week sleeping on a mate’s floor in the suburbs and working as an itinerant builder on the latest craze, loft conversions, while he again waited for the right paperwork.
    .
    The first paid gig he finally landed was worth $3,000, a voiceover for a Fanta commercial that called for an Australian accent. But he didn’t have a social security number, so the Coca-Cola Corporation still owe him that three k. There was a Martin Lawrence flick where he would have played a bloke selling weapons from his car boot, but he needed a work visa for that one, and the visa cost more than the gig.
    .
    He had a “weird, temporary sense” about life. His father would tell him he could come home, there would be enough work back in New Zealand. He was tempted. “Dad would say to me ‘I understand you want to stay there and do this, I get it, these people are heroes to you, but you know you don’t have to slog it out’.”
    .
    What really kept him pursuing it, he says, was Ledger. They first met in Sydney, cast together on a sports drama called Sweat, and when Ledger filmed the movie The Patriot, he loaned Henderson money to keep him going. Seeing Ledger succeeding was motivation.
    .
    Eventually, Henderson’s visa about to expire, money owing to his mum, he got a part in the John Woo war movie Windtalkers. “And once you’ve got a job, your agent can go ‘oh he’s in that new movie with Nicolas Cage’ and they go ‘oh better get him while he’s cheap’, so they sort of future trade you.” Thereafter there was a fairly constant stream of movie roles – The Ring, Torque, Bride and Prejudice, Little Fish.
    .
    When Ledger died in January 2008 from a prescription drug overdose at the age of just 28, Henderson left town for a while. Went to Sydney, Auckland, Melbourne, then decided to come back. “That was a strange moment,” he says, pausing. “Here is someone who had everything, everything you could want. This incredible talent and incredible career in such a short time. And for that to have ended in the way it did was such a shock. For me, existentially, it was ‘what am I doing here’?” But he came back. He had to, he says. He had to work, and by then he had his greencard, his friends, his life, his dog, in LA. He wasn’t leaving.
    .
    Nearly a decade later, we’re sitting in the conference room at Henderson’s agent’s office. He’s just come from a table read of the latest episode of the medical drama, Grey’s Anatomy, in which he plays a Kiwi doctor named Nathan Riggs.
    .
    Henderson’s longstanding refusal to take on television has softened in recent years. “LA has been my base for 17 years, but the majority of my work has been anywhere but here,” he says. “To have a job where I can come home, see my dog, I can stop off at my girlfriend’s on the way home after work – I’ve never had that and that feels like the jackpot, for sure. It’s like normal life for a bit.”
    .
    He talks about travelling to a new town, staying in a hotel, ordering the lamb chops on room service for the third time, so having to find a cafe instead, eating alone with your script, no mates nearby. “I’m not begrudging it. I’m very happy. I’ve had a lovely career and life, but there gets a point where I don’t find it fun or glamorous. I would much rather have a simpler normal existence”.
    .
    The gig on Grey’s, once the highest-rating show on US television, and still a ratings titan in its 14th season, came from a timely call from its creator, Shonda Rhimes, the queen of primetime television drama. Rhimes had twice cast Henderson before, and called him in for a meeting. When Henderson left, he’d all but agreed to the part, then realised he had no idea what it entailed. Rhimes then told him she would write it to suit him. Nathan Riggs duly comes with an orange cordial version of a Kiwi accent, diluted down with the instruction that folks in Milwaukee had to be able to understand him.
    .
    ” ‘So I am basically playing myself, is that what you’re saying’?” Henderson recalls saying to Rhimes. What it meant was that she keeps a famously-tight grip on scripting, and so Henderson learned about Nathan Riggs at the same time as the audience did. “So in a way, my only contribution is to show up, so it is kinda terrifying – on the first day of work I didn’t know what kind of doctor he was, I didn’t know his name – I didn’t know anything. Each episode was a revelation.” He’s quite pleased to learn Grey’s is to screen on TVNZ: his mum had been badgering him to find out where she could watch it.
    .
    Offshore, where it’s still a bigger deal, Henderson has noticed a shift in the attention he gets – particularly in Europe. Ten per cent of the French population tune in, he declares. “I’ve grown up with it [the attention] in a way, so it doesn’t freak me out… it’s just interesting,” he says. Usually, he says, he can do a quick assessment of someone and work out what they recognise him from. “But this one is a lot more ubiqitous”. He has, at least, some practice: Henderson’s wikipedia entry, cynically, still says Henderson is “mostly known in New Zealand for Stu”, the character he played in Shortland Street from 1992 to 1995.
    .
    He’s genuinely amused by this. “I think that’s probably right. If I go home, most people are likely to go ‘Stuey!’ I am always shocked: don’t I look really old? But people still remember me from 17 years ago.”
    .
    Actually, he doesn’t look all that much older, thanks to that cascading mane of hair. But he is past 40 now, and says he’s of an age where male actors start to get offered the best roles and, sadly, female actors get marginalised. He’d still, incidentally, would love to play Hamlet, despite having little desire to do theatre. But these days, he says, he’s not really in pursuit of anything much: he describes himself as “very content”.
    .
    “For me, one of the most important principles to adhere to is just gratitude for what you have and I really feel like I have so much,” he says.
    .
    He handles the obligatory enquiry about his love life with aplomb, saying there’s nothing immediate on the horizon. “But how far away is that horizon? Let’s just say the horizon is not right here. That stuff would be nice, but I haven’t proposed to anyone and I haven’t gotten anyone pregnant.” Instead, there’s the dog, who goes everywhere with him (including this interview).
    .
    As we finish talking, he’s obviously still mulling over Morrison’s quote. By now, he’s decided he quite likes it. “It is a bit like the jackpot, I guess Tem has got a point. In some ways, this is the happiest period of my life.”
    .
    When we do wrap up, he’s in no hurry to leave: the Los Angeles rush hour is in full swing and he has no desire to submerge himself in that for the drive north to Malibu. We end up chatting about mutual friends in the bit of Auckland’s North Shore where Henderson grew up and where I now live, and about the bar at the end of my street where he’s had the odd beer. The American publicist who has sat, mutely, listening in to the conversation, looks duly bemused.
    .
    Outside his agent’s office ten minutes later, I spot Henderson across the traffic-choked road, sauntering along with the dog at his heel. He certainly looks happy.
    .
    Martin Henderson: selected works
    .
    TV: Shortland Street (1992-1995), Big Sky (1996-97), Off the Map (2011), The Red Road (2014-15), Secrets and Lies (2014), Grey’s Anatomy (2015-).
    .
    Film: Kick (1999), Windtalkers (2002), The Ring (2002), Torque (2004), Bride and Prejudice (2004), Little Fish (2005), Everest (2015), Miracles from Heaven (2016).
    .
    The new season of Grey’s Anatomy starts April 18 on TVNZ 2, and is also on TVNZ On-Demand.
    .
    .

    – Sunday Star Times

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 1 week ago by Rachelle.
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